Gold Standard

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  • Market Update: 1989-1998 911
  • Project 914 3.6
  • Tech Forum: "GT1" Engine coolant lines
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When Erion sent five Fuchs alloy wheels to Harvey Weidman at Weidman’s Wheels in Oroville, California he got a positive response. “According to Harvey, it was the first time he’d ever seen five wheels with the same date stamps that were all straight and did not need truing,” recalls Erion. Once the wheels and their center caps were refinished, they were wrapped in a set of Coker replicas of Michelin’s XWX 185/70VR15s.

Originally, this 911T came with a rich-looking Brown interior. However, the intervening years had not been kind: The dash was cracked, the carpet and upholstery faded. Looking around the interior today, there are more NOS parts than you can shake a torsion bar at — including the shift knob, heater controls, door pockets, and turn-signal arm, to name just a few. There’s also a NOS dash with the correct speaker grill, while all five gauges were faithfully rebuilt by North Hollywood Speedometer. There is one tweak, however: The tachometer is redlined to RS 2.7 specs.

“Using all or as many NOS parts as possible was a much bigger job than I ever expected in terms of the amount of time spent researching the 1972 and 1973 model years and then tracking down those parts,” reflects Erion. In other words, he quickly discovered that restoring a 911 with new parts involves more than just throwing your checkbook at the project.

For instance, sourcing the correct carpet and upholstery for the seats and other interior panels proved to be a challenge. Erion found some unfaded carpet in the interior, samples of which were sent to Einmalig in California, which in turn sent the samples to its network of distributors in the hope of finding a match.

“After several months of looking and waiting, one supplier in Germany finally came up with a bolt of the correct carpet,” explains Erion. The carpeting was handed over to John’s Auto Upholstery in Longmont, Colorado, where a kit was made up based on the original carpeting.

The seats and side panels had originally been upholstered in vinyl, but the only matching material Erion could locate was real leather, so the Porsche received something of an upgraded interior. The interior refurbishment also included a new horn button and a re-covered steering wheel.

“There are only two things that were left alone and are in their original condition — the wiring harness and the seat hinges,” says Erion, who says the fact that the seat hardware is unrestored is his only regret. And, when I train my camera on them, I can see why: Their patina stands out against so many nearby components that look brand new. It’s something Erion says he may rectify down the road.

It’s the smallest of nit-picks, though. The results of the time and effort that went into Erion’s T are apparent in person. And though Gold is not a favorite color of mine on any car, there’s no denying that the shade is stunning. Overall, the car looks like 1973 all over again. Peering into the engine compartment, I can’t help but blurt out, “It looks brand new!”

“Well, it should,” responds Erion. Now that his T is restored, he can start driving it — if he can just find the courage. “Right now, I just look at it in the garage for its artistic quality. I’m afraid to damage it or even get it dirty…which really goes against my philosophy, as I am really not a garage trophy kind of guy. I think that, as time goes on, I will forget just how much time, energy, and money I have invested in the car and start driving it in anger.”

The culmination of the restoration also means Erion can turn his attention to the 1970 911E project sitting in the garage. “I haven’t decided what to build yet, but it won’t be a concours project!” he says. Let’s just hope it doesn’t have a rare and desirable list of options.

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