The Allen T

A 700-mile 1973 911T that redefines the term “survivor.”

August 1, 2009

Also from Issue 175

  • 2010 997 GT3: First Drive
  • 917/10: Behind the Wheel
  • 356 Outlaw with a German Twist
  • The Ultimate 944: Raetech’s Racer
  • First Look at 2010 Panamera
  • 914-6 Hot Rod in Jade Green
  • Market Update: 1974-89 911
  • The Man with 10,000 Porsches
  • 16-valve Cylinder Heads for 356s, 914s
  • Porsche Icon: 908
  • Project 914 3.6: Seats, Pedals, and More
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This 1973 Porsche was driven off the lot, used briefly, and then carefully parked and covered in a Michigan garage. It wouldn’t see the light of day for three decades. It would emerge from its long slumber a 700-mile 911T with beautiful paint and an immaculate interior. That’s not what makes it unique, though.

It’s the details that will blow you away. The chrome, aluminum, and rubber trim is all original and all looks new. If soft 36-year-old rubber seals sound impossible, consider the car’s original tires, which have no cracks in their sidewalls. The kicker, though, is the fact that the car still had its factory fill of motor oil until 2008.

“It’s a veritable time capsule in every way,” comments Kent Moore, a Southern California Porsche enthusiast who owns the car today. “That’s been the reaction of everyone who has looked at it. Crowds gather around it. It’s a new car — it is absolutely showroom fresh.”

Moore calls his four-wheeled find “The Ray­mond Allen 911T,” making good on his promise to preserve and show the car as it was when Allen had it. He heard about the car in early 2008, when he got a call from Michigan. It was his old friend Casey McCarthy, a fellow car nut who knew Moore had an affinity for older Porsches.

“He asked me if I’d be interested in a ’73 911T that was part of the estate of a friend’s stepfather,” begins Moore. “The car was in Rochester, just north of Detroit. He went on to tell me the 911 had only 700 miles. I literally almost fell out of my chair. I screamed, ‘Yes…YES!!’” McCarthy had heard about the 911 through a member of his band who was Allen’s stepson. McCarthy told Moore he might be able to “pull some strings” to help him get it.

A few days later, Moore had Lynette DeMonte’s phone number. When he called, he learned that Allen had been a real car nut and had owned a number of interesting, low-mileage vehicles when he died at the age of 80. In addition to the 911T, Allen had a 10th Anniver­sary Pontiac Trans Am with just over 2,000 miles, a pair of 1975 Bricklins, and a 1980 Mercedes-Benz 300SD he bought new and drove for just 1,320 miles. DeMonte explained that Allen, a facilities painter for General Motors, put the miles on his everyday drivers, the last being a 1989 GMC Sierra 4×4 he logged almost 200,000 miles in.

DeMonte remembers Allen as “a wonderful man, selfless but quite private… He liked to collect nice things for his own enjoyment. His favorite, though, was his beloved Auber­gine 911T, which he drove only occasionally over the years.” She remembered sitting in the car several times, but she never got a ride.

“We had a very nice chat,” says Moore. “But she told me that the car was tied up due to a probate technicality. Everything, supposedly, would be worked out soon.” As days turned into weeks, Moore was on pins and needles. He spent hours on the phone with SoCal Por­sche expert Roger Grago and eventually asked him if he knew someone in the Detroit area who could keep a secret. Grago directed him to the R Gruppe’s Midwest Chapter­meister, Curt Egerer.

“Curt agreed to confidentiality, recalls Moore. “He said the car was about 30 minutes away from him and that fellow R Gruppe member Jared Rundell would assist him with the inspection. He then called Lynette, who said it would be okay for them to come by for a look.” On a still-snowy afternoon, Egerer and Rundell made their way to Rochester.

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