Stealth 356

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Stealth 356 1
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Stealth 356 4
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Stealth 356 7

The transmission selected was an aluminum case 901. The case was modified by cutting a portion of the bell housing out and then blending a 356 741 transmission housing to it where the 356 mounts attach. This allows the Emorys to hang the engine and trans in the stock location. The nose cone on the transmission also had to be cut and notched out so it could get closer to the torsion tube. When doing this you also have to remove the speedometer drive in the transmission on a 901. Once all the mods were made to the case, it was sent out to Import Transmission in Portland, Oregon, for the gearing and installation of the ZF limited slip. Dennis wanted a close-ratio ’box and also a taller first gear.

The car was set up for a short wheelbase 911 rear suspension. The only problem with using this suspension is it increases the track at the rear, which requires making the back of the car wider. It was decided to leave the stock track, so this meant they had to narrow the trailing arms. Rod built a jig and moved the bearing housing of the trailing arms in 2.0 in. While doing this they also were able to set them up for the brakes. The rear sway bar is a 19mm rear bar from a 911.

The front suspension features dropped spindles (by 2.0 in.) and a 22mm Weltmeister sway bar. Since dropped spindles don’t allow for the stock 356 speedometer cable (they already had removed the speedometer drive from the 901 transmission), they had Kevin at North Hollywood Speedometer build them one with an electronic pick-up and a gauge that looks exactly like the 356 gauge but with 911 SC electronics inside.

Rod wanted this Emory Special to have the drum-brake look but with disc brakes. This enabled them to use the RS/60 Annular brakes developed by Dario Calandra, Buddy Cone and Rod. With the large bolt pattern, he had wheels built for the car—16x5-in. billets with the look of an early Pre-A wheel—finished in a satin, brushed clearcoat to help them avoid brake-dust stains. Tire size is 195/60-16.

The Interior

The interior design brief was “simple and elegant,” so a dark green leather and green carpet was chosen. The seats came from Fibersteel, the carpet and interior trim from Autobahn. Rod’s interior installer, Tom Finley, installed and upholstered the seats, which include black corduroy inserts. The 911 R steering wheel in black is an appropriately sporty choice.

The roll bar is non-removable with side bars and is painted gloss black. Because a later transmission was used, the shifter had to be changed to a C shifter base and a Willhoit short shift lever, finished off with, you guessed it, an Emory Outlaw Eagle shift knob.

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